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August 28, 2005

The Summer Is Over

After spending the month of May in Cairo, I returned to Montreal to take care of few personal matters before the new academic year starts in September. It was a very self centered summer. Still, I could not stop worrying and reading about events back at home.
Lots of things happened since the end of May: the results of the referendum on the constitutional amendment, few violent demonstrations, the assassination of the Egyptian ambassador in Baghad, Sharm el Sheikh’s explosions, the presidential elections nominations, the boycotts, the failure of Arab leaders to convene for an “emergency summit”, and the Israeli withdrawal from the Gaza strip.

I hate to admit that my hope in the betterment of Egypt is loosing its grounds bit by bit. Few weeks from now, Mr. Hosni Mubarak will win the presidential elections with a new mandate; the mandate of being “elected” amongst several candidates or as I would like to call them clowns of the elections circus. However, the mandate that sustained Mubarak in power all these past years and will still keep him in power is not the mandate of the votes of the Egyptian people. It is the mandate given to him by an oligarchy of business men, government officials, and all the benefactors of the status quo. It is also a mandate given to him by the US and Israel. Who else is making sure that the American and Israeli plans in the region are achieved and implemented according to plan? Who else is making sure that Israel is integrated into the region through commercial and economic treaties such as the Qualified Industrial Zones (QIZ)? Who else is enforcing the legitimacy of the interim Iraqi government? Who else is supplying Israel with natural gas? Who is helping Israel implement its unilateral disengagement plan in Gaza by training Palestinian forces and by guarding the southern Israeli borders? Who else other than his Excellency President Hosni Mubarak and his corrupt regime?

I hate to admit that all these benefactors were stronger than the forces calling for change in Egypt. Even the other presidential “candidates” are benefiting from the elections circus. The quasi-parties are getting half a million pounds for just putting the name on the ballot. I will be very surprised if they will actually spend ten percent of this money. The two main “contenders” Ayman Nour and Noeman Gomaa are basically there for the show and to enhance their public image. I do not think any of them actually thinks that he stands a chance to even getting fifteen percent of the votes.

On another track, the opposition forces missed a life time opportunity to unite and to take the same stand. The Muslim Brotherhood is still playing the same game of being friendly to everybody to survive. The Nassirist and the Tagamue parties failed to get the other parties on their sides in the boycott. Kifaya movement is still struggling though there is little it can do if everyone else is running after his own benefit.

The only hope is that the judges will take a historical stand and boycott supervising the elections process. Along with that, the resurrection of the political life in Egypt is giving me hope.

Well, the summer is over and there more to work on, dream of, and aspire to.
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5 comments:

BS said...

I'm away from home too and I feel terrible at the thought that there's no chance for the people out there to improve their lives merely because of few corrupt individuals holding high and influential posts in the government and major businesses.
I really cannot think what this country is coming to...

Kira Zalan said...

The most important part of this quasi-election are the long-term consequences. Tarek Atia brilliantly notes that the election logo that has become “a permanent fixture on [national] channels… may change things. Intentional or not, the flag immediately attracts young children. “What is that?” they ask their parents. The typical response would probably be much like what Kamelia Hamed told her son when he asked, that the flag is part of the election campaign, which is a process by which the public chooses their leader from among several candidates.

In that simple exchange, a revolution of sorts has already occurred.

Anonymous said...

well mr samer, it is indeed a good thing you went back to wherever you are.
I detest those who repeat blindly whatever crap they read & hear.
First of all, he is not in power because of a mixed oligarch of businessmen & government officials, this is Egypt not the United states!!
Secondly,What plans are you talking about? Integration, qiz & gas? whats wrong with it? Palestinians do trade with Israelis on a daily basis & they benefit alot from them for your info. AT this day & age one still gets to hear old fashioned rubbed in the ground crap, what year is it mr samer?
As if canada, the safe haven you are in, doesnt hold more trade with Israel than Egypt does?
p.s: around 45% of egyptians cannot read or write, they dont start any schools or colleges in egypt, let alone snowy montreal, so how are they supposed to pick the right candidate for the job may i ask??
Your views are more like echoes of a parrot trying hard in vain to sound intellectual. I suggest lots of reading with tedious observation & application of reasoning & you might start to have your own opinions.
But i guess not!

Anonymous said...

I always thought that names mean nothing when it comes to political debate. Therefore, I have chosen to be anonymous.
I understand your pessimism regarding political reform in Egypt. As far as I am concern, Egypt plitical and econ9omic system collapsed in 1945.
Saddat and Mubarak were merely political clowns. Their predessor, Nasser, made an attempt, but was let down by his cronies and the lack of resove of the Egyptial People.
when you review history, you find that all great nations and super powers were founded by means of arm struggle and bloodshed, not by demonistrations, debate and blogging. Until then, the present status will be maintained and the rich will get richer and the poor will get poorer and Mubarak and his Family and ministers will prevail. Essential they own Egypt along with the rich elite!

Anonymous said...

I always thought that names mean nothing when it comes to political debate. Therefore, I have chosen to be anonymous.
I understand your pessimism regarding political reform in Egypt. As far as I am concern, Egypt plitical and economic system collapsed in 1945.
Saddat and Mubarak were merely political clowns. Their predessor, Nasser, made an attempt, but was let down by his cronies and the lack of resolve of the Egyptial People.
when you review history, you find that all great nations and super powers were founded by means of arm struggle and bloodshed, not by demonistrations, debate and blogging. Until then, the present status will be maintained and the rich will get richer and the poor will get poorer and Mubarak and his Family and ministers will prevail. Essential they own Egypt along with the rich elite!